An analysis of as i lay dying by william fauklner

In Faulkner moved to New Orleans and worked as a journalist, here he met the American Sherwood Andersen, a famous short-story writer. Anderson convinced Faulkner that writing about the people and places he could identify with would improve his career as a writer. After a trip to Europe, Faulkner began to write of the fictitious Yoknapatawpha County, which was representative of Lafayette County, Mississippi. In this book, and others of this series, it was commonplace to find sentences that stretched on for a page in order to create mood, multiple narrators, or short stories complicated with a stream-of-consciousness blather that was hard to understand.

An analysis of as i lay dying by william fauklner

With more monologues than any other character, Darl becomes in essence the spokesman for the work. In the initial monologues, Darl outlines through purely narrative speech the exposition of the novel; however, by his final monologue, Darl has little narrative speech and, in fact, has experienced a split in his personality.

His deictic references, along with linguistic repetition, highlight this chasm. By his final monologue, Darl sees himself as an onlooker, having lost his distinctness as character. Additional linguistic markers that offer insight include a stylistic shift in clause construction from initial to final monologue.

The final monologue features relatively few prepositional phrases diminishing the intensity of his perceptions.

The loss of adjectival modifiers colors the fading landscape of the speaker as his world becomes more inward. Using discourse analysis as one tool to unlock this amazing novel, one can appreciate the linguistic brilliance of its construction.

Darl was mad from the first. Jewel resisted because he was sane and he was the toughest. But he was mad all the time. His mother dies, and the family is duty bound to take her body for burial to a cemetery forty miles away. The Bundrens encounter the oppressive heat of July in northern Mississippi, and the rising flood waters of the rivers they must cross, all while transporting a rapidly decaying corpse.

His act of arson, while perhaps a desperate attempt to end the journey, nonetheless lands him on a train bound for the state mental institution where he will live out the remainder of his days.

Although the multiplicity of viewpoints, presenting each part of the novel through the consciousness of a particular character, may create the illusion that Faulkner has disappeared as the all-powerful manipulator, it is the style that makes him visible again. Volpe also addresses the function of these monologues: No single character can be designated as a spokesman for the author, and no single character can be considered as objective recorder of events.

He did things which seemed to me he had to do or he insisted on doing. I mean that any character that you write about takes charge of his own behavior. Darl did things which I am sure were for his own mad reasons quite logical. His comments serve to outline not only the parameters of the farm and field but also establish the plot.

His evaluations of Jewel, his headstrong brother, and Cash, the good carpenter, are valid. This Darl, while clearly the most sensitive and indeed intuitive member of the family, seems centered and rational as the novel opens.

By his last monologue, his nineteenth, Darl has, in fact, experienced a split in his personality.

Nov 11,  · Faulkner’s works, like their creator, are highly complex. His style has caused much difficulty for readers, especially if The Sound and the Fury, Light in August, As I Lay Dying, or Absalom. William Faulkner was born in New Albany, Mississippi where he became a high school dropout and was forced to work with grandfather at a bank. In Faulkner moved to New Orleans and worked as a journalist, here he met the American Sherwood Andersen, . May 09,  · As I Lay Dying Study Guide, Chapter Summaries, Character Descriptions, Study Questions, Essay Topics, and More. Cliff Notes™, Cliffs Notes™, Cliffnotes™, Cliffsnotes™ are trademarked properties of the John Wiley Publishing Company.

This voyeurism finds a linguistic home in the clear distinction of personal pronouns. References to self, clearly absent in monologue one, play an integral role in monologue nineteen.

An analysis of as i lay dying by william fauklner

Finally, the use of repetition in both monologues is purposeful. The conclusion of the monologue with the repetition and strategic placement of Chuck provides phonological cohesion. He is the detached, separated Darl. Gone are the references to we. These occurrences can be interpreted as a result of the objectification and disassociation that has occurred in his persona.

This schizophrenic split is also confirmed by the addition of the pronoun you. In monologue one, Darl does not make use of any second person personal pronouns.About As I Lay Dying. Selected by the Modern Library as one of the best novels of all time From the Modern Library’s new set of beautifully repackaged hardcover classics by William Faulkner—also available are Snopes, The Sound and the Fury, Light in August, Absalom, Absalom!, and Selected Short Stories One of William Faulkner’s finest novels, As I Lay Dying, originally published in.

As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner. Home / Literature / As I Lay Dying / As I Lay Dying Analysis Literary Devices in As I Lay Dying.

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory. Waiting for Addie’s deathThe first few chapters of As I Lay Dying explore many different perspectives, but all are focused around the same thing: Addie is dying.

Read an in-depth analysis of Darl Bundren. Jewel - The bastard child of Addie and Whitfield, the minister.

Though Darl seems to understand him, Jewel remains the novel’s greatest mystery, and is the least represented in its many sections.

Nov 11,  · Faulkner’s works, like their creator, are highly complex. His style has caused much difficulty for readers, especially if The Sound and the Fury, Light in August, As I Lay Dying, or Absalom.

As I Lay Dying was published in , immediately following the work that many consider to be Faulkner's masterpiece, The Sound and the ashio-midori.com Sound and the Fury is widely considered to be among the greatest of the modernist novels, and is hailed as a masterpiece of 20th century literature.

An analysis of as i lay dying by william fauklner

May 09,  · As I Lay Dying Study Guide, Chapter Summaries, Character Descriptions, Study Questions, Essay Topics, and More. Cliff Notes™, Cliffs Notes™, Cliffnotes™, Cliffsnotes™ are trademarked properties of the John Wiley Publishing Company.

William Faulkner & As I Lay Dying Analysis – SchoolWorkHelper