An analysis of oresteia

Background[ edit ] Electra and Orestes, matricides As a psychoanalytic term for daughter—mother psychosexual conflict, the Electra complex derives from the Greek mythologic character Electrawho plotted matricidal revenge with Orestesher brother, against Clytemnestratheir mother, and Aegisthustheir stepfather, for their murder of Agamemnontheir father cf. Electraby Sophocles. This internalization of "Mother" develops the super-ego as the girl establishes a discrete sexual identity ego. Without a penis, the girl cannot sexually possess her mother, as the infantile id demands.

An analysis of oresteia

They relentlessly pursue Orestes for the killing of his mother. Seeing the Furies asleep, Clytemnestra 's ghost comes to wake them up to obtain justice on her son Orestes for killing her. This trial is made up of a group of twelve Athenian citizens and is supervised by none other than Athena herself.

Here Orestes is used as a trial dummy by Athena to set-up the first courtroom trial. He is also the object of central focus between the Furies, Apollo, and Athena. Athena casts the deciding vote and determines that Orestes will not be killed.

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She then changes their names from the Furies to "the Eumenides" which means "the Kindly Ones". However, it is widely believed to have been based on the story told in Book IV of Homer 's Odysseywhere Menelaus, Agamemnon's brother, attempts to return home from Troy and finds himself on an island off Egypt, "whither he seems to have been carried by the storm described in Agam.

In the process, Proteus tells Menelaus of the death of Agamemnon at the hands of Aegisthus as well as the fates of Ajax the Lesser and Odysseus at sea; and is compelled to tell Menelaus how to reach home from the island of Pharos.

Analysis of themes[ edit ] In this trilogy there are multiple themes carried through all three plays. Other themes can be found and in one, or two, of the three An analysis of oresteia, but are not applicable to the Trilogy as a whole and thus are not considered themes of the trilogy.

Justice through retaliation[ edit ] Retaliation is seen in the Oresteia in a slippery slope form, occurring subsequently after the actions of one character to another. In the first play Agamemnon, it is mentioned how in order to shift the wind for his voyage to Troy, Agamemnon had to sacrifice his innocent daughter Iphigenia.

Therefore, she found a new lover Aegisthus. And when Agamemnon returned to Argos from the Trojan WarClytemnestra killed him by stabbing him in the bathtub and would eventually inherit his throne. Through much pressure from Electra and his cousin Pylades Orestes eventually kills his mother Clytemnestra and her lover Aegisthus in "The Libation Bearers".

And even after he gets away from them Clytemnestra's spirit comes back to rally them again so that they can kill Orestes and obtain vengeance for her.

An analysis of oresteia

After Orestes begged Athena for deliverance from 'the Erinyes ,' she granted him his request in the form of a trial. This is the first example of proper litigation in the trilogy and illuminates the change from emotional retaliation to civilized decisions regarding alleged crimes.

In addition, Athena set up the ground rules for how the verdict would be decided so that everything would be dealt with fairly. By Athena creating this blueprint the future of revenge-killings and the merciless hunting of the Furies would be eliminated from Greece.

Once the trial concluded, Athena proclaimed the innocence of Orestes and he was set free from the Furies. The cycle of murder and revenge had come to an end while the foundation for future litigation had been laid.

Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. January This section possibly contains original research.

Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. January Learn how and when to remove this template message There are many didactic motives in the Oresteia, one of them being the matter of moral responsibility.

The characters in the play often face difficulty when it comes to accepting the blame for their actions. Two main characters that are prime examples of this are Orestes and Agamemnon.

Moral responsibility is "the status of morally deserving praise, blame, reward, or punishment for an act or omission, in accordance with one's moral obligations. It can be argued that Agamemnon did not accept moral responsibility for sacrificing his daughter, Iphigenia, in order to be able to sail to Troy without the wind interfering.

This does not mean that Agamemnon was not morally responsible. Both sides of the argument stand; that because of the circumstances surrounding his actions, Agamemnon cannot be seen as morally responsible, or, no matter the circumstances, he was morally responsible for killing his daughter.The Oresteia (Ancient Greek: Ὀρέστεια) is a trilogy of Greek tragedies written by Aeschylus in the 5th century BC, concerning the murder of Agamemnon by Clytaemnestra, the murder of Clytaemnestra by Orestes, the trial of Orestes, the end of the curse on the House of Atreus and pacification of the ashio-midori.com trilogy—consisting of Agamemnon (Ἀγαμέμνων), The Libation Bearers.

Free conflict resolution papers, essays, and research papers. “The Oresteia” (comprising “Agamemnon”, “The Libation Bearers” and “The Eumenides”) is the only surviving example of a complete trilogy of ancient Greek plays (a fourth play, which would have been performed as a comic finale, a satyr play called “Proteus”, has not survived).It was originally performed at the annual Dionysia festival in Athens in BCE, where it won first.

An analysis of oresteia

The Oresteia (Ancient Greek: Ὀρέστεια) is a trilogy of Greek tragedies written by Aeschylus in the 5th century BC, concerning the murder of Agamemnon by Clytaemnestra, the murder of Clytaemnestra by Orestes, the trial of Orestes, the end of the curse on the House of Atreus and pacification of the ashio-midori.com .

Ancient Greek Theater.

Greek Tragedy - world, body, life, history, time, person, human, Origins and Evolution

The theater of Dionysus, Athens (Saskia, Ltd.) This page is designed to provide a brief introduction to Ancient Greek Theater, and to provide tools for further research.

Biomorphic Surrealism shaped the style of Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (), the work that launched Bacon's reputation when it was exhibited in London in the final weeks of World War II. The work established many of the themes that would occupy the rest of his career, namely humanity's capacity for self-destruction and its fate in an age of global war.

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