Rosalind krauss photographys discursive spaces

They are both uncertain documents and beguiling pictures, and much more personal than their rather dry appearance suggests. So, on what basis does Krauss attempt to upset the apple cart of photographic critisicm and how well do her arguments stand up?

Rosalind krauss photographys discursive spaces

Early life[ edit ] Krauss was born to Matthew M. Epstein and Bertha Luber [2] in Washington D. Krauss wrote her dissertation on the work of David Smith.

Rosalind krauss photographys discursive spaces

The dissertation was published as Terminal Iron Works in Her commitment to the emerging minimal art in particular set her apart from Michael Friedwho was oriented toward the continuation of modernist abstraction in Jules OlitskiKenneth Noland and Anthony Caro.

Founding October[ edit ] Krauss became dissatisfied with Artforum when in its November issue it published a full-page advertisement by featuring the artist Lynda Benglis aggressively posed with a large latex dildo and wearing only a pair of sunglasses promoting an upcoming exhibition of hers at the Paula Cooper Gallery.

Krauss was appointed as its founding editor. Jeremy Gilbert-Rolfe withdrew after only a few issues, and by the spring ofDouglas Crimp joined the editorial team.

BuchlohDenis Hollier, and John Rajchman. She held the title of Distinguished Professor Rosalind krauss photographys discursive spaces Hunter until she left to join the Columbia University faculty in She recently received an honorary doctorate from the University of London.

Modernism Against the Grain" in Greenbergian tradition[ edit ] Krauss's attempts to understand the phenomenon of modernist art, in its historical, theoretical, and formal dimensions, have led her in various directions.

She has, for example, been interested in the development of photography, whose history — running parallel to that of modernist painting and sculpture — makes visible certain previously overlooked phenomena in the "high arts", such as the role of the indexical mark, or the function of the archive.

She has also investigated certain concepts, such as "formlessness", "the optical unconscious", or "pastiche", which organize modernist practice in relation to different explanatory grids from those of progressive modernism, or the avant-garde.

Like many, Krauss had been drawn to the criticism of Clement Greenbergas a counterweight to the highly subjective, poetic approach of Harold Rosenberg.

The poet-critic model proved long-lasting in the New York scene, with products from Frank O'Hara to Kynaston McShine to Peter Schjeldahlbut for Krauss and others, its basis in subjective expression was fatally unable to account for how a particular artwork's objective structure gives rise to its associated subjective effects.

Greenberg's way of assessing how an art object works, or how it is put together, became for Krauss a fruitful resource; [11] even if she and fellow "Greenberger", Michael Friedwould break first with the older critic, and then with each other, at particular moments of judgment, the commitment to formal analysis as the necessary if not sufficient ground of serious criticism would still remain for both of them.

Decades after her first engagement with Greenberg, Krauss still used his ideas about an artwork's 'medium' as a jumping-off point for her strongest effort to come to terms with post art in the person of William Kentridge. Krauss would formulate this formalist commitment in strong terms, against attempts to account for powerful artworks in terms of residual ideas about an artist's individual genius, for instance in the essays "The Originality of the Avant-Garde: Her work has helped establish the position of these writers within the study of art, even at the cost of provoking anxiety about threats to the discipline's autonomy.

She is currently preparing a second volume of collected essays as a sequel to The Originality of the Avant Garde and Other Modernist Myths In many cases, Krauss is credited as a leader in bringing these concepts to bear on the study of modern art.

For instance, her Passages in Modern Sculpture makes important use of Merleau-Ponty 's phenomenology as she had come to understand it in thinking about minimal art for viewing modern sculpture in general. In her study of Surrealist photography, she rejected William Rubin 's efforts at formal categorization as insufficient, instead advocating the psychoanalytic categories of "dream" and "automatism", as well as Jacques Derrida 's "grammatological" idea of "spacing.

Picasso's collages[ edit ] Concerning Cubist art, she took Picasso's collage breakthrough to be explicable in terms of Saussure 's ideas about the differential relations and non-referentiality of language, rejecting efforts by other scholars to tie the pasted newspaper clippings to social history.

Similarly, she held Picasso's stylistic developments in Cubist portraiture to be products of theoretical problems internal to art, rather than outcomes of the artist's love life.

Photography and Surrealism, Cindy Sherman: Interpreting Pollock[ edit ] Years after her time at Artforum in the s, Krauss also returned to the drip painting of Jackson Pollock as both a culmination of modernist work within the format of the "easel picture", and a breakthrough that opened the way for several important developments in later art, from Allan Kaprow 's happenings to Richard Serra 's lead-flinging process art to Andy Warhol 's oxidation i.

In addition to writing focused studies about individual artists, Krauss also produced broader, synthetic studies that helped gather together and define the limits of particular fields of practice. Examples of this include "Sense and Sensibility: Reflections on Post '60s Sculpture" Artforum, Nov.

Format and Image in 20th Century Art exh. Selected books by Krauss[ edit ] Terminal Iron Works: The Sculpture of David Smith. The Sculpture of David Smith:Rosalind Krauss - Photographys Discursive Spaces Words | 38 Pages Photography's Discursive Spaces: Landscape/View Rosalind Krauss Art .

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Photography's Discursive Spaces: Landscape/View Citations Metrics; Reprints & Permissions; PDF Abstract. Let us start with two images, identically titled Tufa Domes, Pyramid Rosalind Krauss is Professor of Art History at Hunter College, C.U.N.Y., and an editor of October.

Photography 's Discursive Spaces: Landscape/View By Rosalind Krauss et us start with two images, identically titled Tufa Domes, Pyramid Lake, Nevada. The first (Fig.

Rosalind krauss photographys discursive spaces

1) is a (recently) celebrated photograph made by Timothy. Krauss would formulate this formalist commitment in strong terms, against attempts to account for powerful artworks in terms of residual ideas about an artist's individual genius, for instance in the essays "The Originality of the Avant-Garde: A Postmodernist Repetition" and "Photography's Discursive Spaces." For Krauss, and for the school of.

Jul 29,  · Photography in the museum or in the gallery?: Reflections on ‘Photography’s Discursive Spaces: Landscape/ View’ by Rosalind Krauss. I read R.

Krauss’s essay with great interest. Let us start with two images, identically titled Tufa Domes, Pyramid Lake, Nevada. The first (Fig. 1) is a (recently) celebrated photograph made by Timothy O'Sullivan in that functions with special insistence within the art historical construction of nineteenth-century landscape photography.

Part 1 Exercise Photography in the museum or in the gallery – Reflections on ‘Photography’s Discursive Spaces: Landscape/ View’ by Rosalind Krauss. Rosalind Epstein Krauss () is an American art critic and theorist. She is a professor at Columbia University in New York ashio-midori.com: Aaaaarg, Wikipedia, ashio-midori.com, OpenLibrary. Discursive Essay Sean Killoran The death penalty, used from and fully abolished in , was said to have cut crimes by two thirds. It is a controversial topic ever since it was created. It has taken the lives of guilty and innocent parties. In a recent survey 70% or .

The second (Fig. 2) is a lithographic copy of the first, produced for the publication of Clarence.

Rosalind E. Krauss - Wikipedia